Transmission Stuff

Transmission Stuff

This is information is untested by me.  I always take my Transmissions to a specialist.  I am not knowledgeable enough about transmissions to attempt these adjustments made by the older Dodge Motorhome Owners.

James Gary "Andy" Anderson  

Dodgetravcos.com



Mopar Speedometer Pinion Numbers
AXLE RATIO 24" 26" 28" 30"  Tire overall Diameter
2.76 2538930 2538928 2538926 2538924
2.94 2538932 2538930 2538928 2538926
3.21 2538935 2538933 2838931 2838929
3.55 2538939 2538936 2538933 2538931
3.91 2538943 2538940 2538937 2538935
4.10 2538945 2538942 2538939 2538936
4.30   2538944 2538941 2538938
4.56   2538945 2538943 2538940

Please note: these numbers are for the standard style pinion gear
also last two numbers are the number of teeth, 2538945 = 45 teeth


The Proper Kit Down Linkage

This is a very important step. The kickdown is necessary to regulate the valve body pressure within the transmission. In order for the transmission to shift hard with little overlap, you need full pressure or the bands will slip under acceleration. While cruising, excessive pressure is unnecessary and can cause a lot of heat buildup in the transmission. The proper kickdown linkage can save a freshly rebuilt tranny and have it live a long happy life

 The only time you don't need a kickdown is your tranny is built with a fully manual valve body. This means that each gear must be selected because the automatic features have been eliminated. Since there is no automatic action within the transmission, the kickdown becomes irrelevant and unnecessary. This is usually only built into a race only transmission.

Chrysler had two different kick-down rod assemblies available. One used a solid bent rod with adjustments at the transmission Either one can be used but one has certain advantages to the other.


 The one piece seems to be easier to fine tune. The problem with it is it sometimes doesn't clear the lip created where the firewall and floor pan meets. This lip can be banged flat to allow the rod full travel. It is much easier to do this when the engine is out. It can be done with the engine in if you use a long solid metal rod and a hammer from underneath to flatten the lip.

 The other used a three-piece rod assembly with two pivot points and an adjustment at the transmission.

The best set up is the three pieces. It allows full movement of the kickdown lever with no modification. It is important that you need to have the pivot bracket on the transmission before installation. There is little room between the header collector and the transmission to try and bolt it up after the transmission is in.

The New hardware Kickdown Linkage conversion

 The kickdown brackets and rigging for most of the M300, M400, M500, and M600 series rigs is no longer available from Dodge. I haven’t seen these for sale on ebay either, so if you find yourself needing one of these setups consider using modern parts to complete the job. I installed this modification when I had the transmission rebuilt a couple of years ago.

           Try securing a 1997 Dakota 360 kickdown cable at a nearby junkyard or www.junkyarddog.com. You will also need the standoff bracket and gear selector lever from the transmission to complete the swap. Four piece  of newer type hardware should be easily found most anywhere.  Some minor fabrication and adjustment to the throttle bracket will probably be necessary, but these are very minor considerations when you are in need. The total length of the assembly was very close to the original, and it was one of the easier upgrades that I’ve seen done over the years.

 If all else fails go over the counter at your local Dodge dealer, he can get the right newer parts and do so at fairly reasonable price.
This is a cheaper alternative than buying other ready made kits (which usually need some modifications anyway). Not to bash these companies products but the transmission automatic kickdown linkage kit from Lokar has some very incomplete directions at a reasonable price around $60.  The Bouchillion kit is a bit pricey at $100+ but has a very high quality.

 The one part you may need to fabricate or buy is the cabling holder near the carb. I was able to just cut the stock kickdown bracket off and had it welded it to the stock throttle bracket.  It works fine and I have some bit of adjustability of the shifting points. I used the Bouchillion kit and needed to make one part big deal.  The directions were great, and I can adjust the shift points very quickly if necessary.  This is usually only done the very first time or two after any alteration, then is set for the life of things.

Notes about kickdown linkages.

 In order for the transmission to work correctly, unless a manual valve body is in place, it is absolutely necessary to have this linkage in place and working correctly. If you're not very familiar with Torqueflites, Read how it works and why it's so important.

 The pedal to throttle linkage is used to determine the load on the vehicle at a given time. Most of the Brand X transmissions use vacuum modulators, which use an intake manifold vacuum source to determine the load on the transmission. Torqueflites have no modulators, they need the input from the throttle linkage, which is connected to the carburetor and tells the transmission how much load.

 Inside the transmission, a lever pushes on the throttle valve, which raises line pressure according to how far the throttle valve is pushed back into its bore in the valve body (it's not exactly that simple, but it will suffice for this explanation).

As the vehicle speed increases, so does governor pressure. For the most part, throttle pressure is working against governor pressure to try to stroke the 1-2 or 2-3 shift valve, depending on vehicle speed.

 Once governor pressure overcomes throttle pressure, the 1-2 shift valve is stroked, the rear band releases, the front band applies, and the transmission is in 2nd gear. The same thing happens for the 2-3 shift. Once governor pressure is high enough to stroke the 2-3 shift valve, the front band releases and the front (direct) clutch applies and the transmission is in 3rd gear.

Now, if there is NO input from the throttle valve, the governor pressure will quickly overcome the 1-2, and the 2-3 shift valves. In most cases, unless the shift valves are sticking in the valve body, the transmission will be in 3rd gear by somewhere around 20-25 mph, from what I've seen. The worst part of having no throttle linkage isn't the quick shifts. Earlier it was said that input to the throttle valve increases line pressure in the transmission. Without any boost in line pressure, the clutch pistons and servos won't get the extra fluid pressure they need to keep the clutches and bands from slipping under a load.

 When they slip, they wear. It's just like sliding the clutch with a standard transmission. Sure, you can drive like that for awhile, but there's only so much friction material there. When it's gone, it won't move at all. The same holds true of Torqueflite clutches. They're tough, but they won't last forever. We always use best quality racing clutches when we have them rebuilt for these reasons.

 That one of the beautiful things of the Dodge Motorhome transmissions, is that they usually had more clutch packs installed from the factory similar to the Hemi and high performance big block racing stuff from the late 1960’s and early 1970’s. The muscle car and high performance era contributed a lot to increasing the popularity of RV’s by contributing to the performance and reliability of these vehicles. If you are considering rebuilding your 727, think about combining some 727 racing clutches, a solid flexplate, a shift kit, a deep pan, and a new type towing convertor. After all of these we should have another legandary 727 transmission once again.

 

Introduction   

The beauty of the solid flexplate is in the design strength inherent in it’s metal. The more the merrier as we would say. Although the purpose of the flexplate is to flex, and this isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but to flex constantly and repeatedly is to break eventually. I have met at least two people who have broken these things. In the racing community, it is normal to require a serialized and inspected flex plate which is checked and updated every two years to insure against breakage of this part.

 Make sure before you order it whether you have an internally or externally balanced engine.  I believe that all 318’s were internally balanced while all 360’s were externally done.  413’s and 440’s I believe were internally balanced but I’m not 100% sure, I think it depends on the date of manufacture. REMARKS. Older 1960’s truck 413 steel cranks also had an 8 bolt flex plate so make sure exactly what combination you have before

 In our case we were pulling the trans-mission for a rebuild and decided to invest a little money at this particular part, knowing that we have seen them go bad on small blocks in the past.  Kind of like a one-time payment of cheap insurance against breakage.  The unit we installed had a “THIS SIDE TOWARDS ENGINE” for the idiots like myself. I would match up the flex plate bolt pattern with the torque convertor first and paint an indicator marking on one fin-bolt combination. This way when everything is back in place you can simply line up the marks and tighten it up.

 

This article is a compilation of some 727 Transmission INFORMATION PULLED FROM THE WEB!–I suspect that this is applicable to Dodge chassis truck transmissions.  I’ve have always heard that the motor-home transmission was different than a normal car’s transmission.  I suspected that motorhome’s have one of the four pinion planets installed.   Big Dodge trucks had it in the front, while Mopar vans and small trucks probably have the 3 disk clutch pack installed. The information below supports my theory.  This article is intended for informational purposes, if you are having your transmission rebuilt,  a copy of this article given to your shop could save some potential future headaches.

 

The Hemi 727's had different front pumps, that were clearanced for the wider front drum (66-70), the high clutch drum was wider, the early Hemi 727's used a Spirolox ring to hold the high clutch return spring retainer on. The kickdown band was wider, the 5.0 kickdown lever was only used with the Hemi 727's (Includes 440-6's), They used only 1 kickdown servo spring (inner), A different forward clutch drum, to clear the wider high clutch drum. 1967 and later ones used 4 pinion planetaries. The input shaft was marked for the heavy-duty transmission. They used a high up-shift speed governor weight package. They were supposed to have used a different 1-2 shift plug, and a different convertor with 7/16" bolts, and a higher stall speed. I am certain I am not remembering everything, but that covers most of the basics.
As far as what had 4 pinion planet, there is a question that is difficult to answer right away, because they varied greatly between years. I will however do my best to answer that.

 
1967: All hemi, and 440 HP's had them front and rear. Std 440's had them in front

          (All the way up to 1978 in fact!)
1968: 426 Hemi, and 383/335 & 440/375 (340 had front)
1969: 426 Hemi, and 383/335, 440/375 & 440/390 (340 had front)
1970: 426 Hemi, 440/375, & 440/390 (383/335 had only 4 pinion in front at this time.

  (340 had front, 340 T/A had front and rear)
1971: 426 Hemi, 440/375, & 440/390. 383/Road Runner engine had only 4 pinion in

   front at this time. (340 had front)
1972: 440HP, & 440-6,big block trucks, F&R 400HP, and 340's had front only
1973: 440HP, & 440-6, big block trucks. F&R 400HP, and 340's had front only
1974: 440HP, & 440-6, big block trucks. F&R 400HP, and 360HP's had front only
1975: 440HP, & 440-6, big block trucks. F&R 400HP, and 360HP's had front only
1976: 440HP, & 440-6, big block trucks. F&R 400HP, and 360HP's had front only
1977: 440HP, & 440-6, big block trucks. F&R 400HP, and 360HP's had front only
1978: 440HP, & 440-6, big block trucks, F&R 400HP, and 360HP's had front only
 
A four clutch front planet will fit any A727 transmission from 1966 through 1975. It will NOT fit earlier transmissions unless ALL gears are changed at the SAME time. It will install into later transmissions, but when used in moderate to high torque applications, the SPLINES WILL STRIP, rendering the vehicle stationary.

Later shafts will retrofit into earlier transmissions after 1965.

This planet was made from 1966 thru 1975 by MOPAR to fit all 727 transmissions.

Specifications: 4 pinions. Early splines (before 1976). Late gear pitch (after 1965). Splines onto front end of output shaft. Held in place by snap ring on output shaft.

 http://mmerlinn.tripod.com/f/p0notes.htm

 High Drum Information

High drums in A727 transmission come in several different flavors. In particular they are 3-friction, 4-friction, or 5-friction and either narrow bushing or wide bushing.

The vast majority of high drums use only three frictions. Some of the heavier duty applications used a 4-friction drum. The 5-friction drum was used ONLY behind a Hemi engine. The 3- & 4-packs are totally interchangeable as long as bushing size is considered. Because of the larger size of the 5-pak drum, a special pump assembly and special forward drum are REQUIRED to use it.

Early A727 transmissions all used a narrow (1/2" wide) bushing in this drum, while later models were upgraded to a wide (1" wide) bushing. Wide bushing drums do NOT interchange with narrow ones. If you change torque converter, pump assembly, input shaft, forward drum hub, and high drum, either bushing type will work in any A727.

The ONLY positive way to determine which drum will work in your transmission, is for you to remove the pump assembly from the transmission and measure the bushing surface length where the drum fits on the back of the pump. IF no one has ever replaced the pump body, then you may remove the converter to determine bushing size. If there is a 2" round BULGE around the vent hole at the top of the pump, then you need a later wide bushing, otherwise you need the narrow bushing. HOWEVER, THIS PART OF THE PUMP WILL FIT IN ANY A727, so it is POSSIBLE that your transmission COULD have a late type pump body and an early bushing drum or vice versa. If you order a drum using this vent criteria and it is wrong, you now own a boat anchor. To be safe, you MUST physically measure the bushing surface length.

To sum up we have the following possibilities:

  • Early narrow bushing (1/2" wide)
    • 3-friction
    • 4-friction
    • 5-friction (Hemi only)
  • Late wide bushing (1" wide)
    • 3-friction
    • 4-friction

 Front Planets


The A727 transmission has several different types of front planets. Some interchange with each other and some don't. Unfortunately this interchangeability is VERY hard to determine accurately. Basically there are only three types of differences, 1) 3 or 4 pinions, 2) early or late gear pitch, and 3) early or late output shaft splines.

In the first case, a simple count will suffice.

The second case is a little harder, but since all planets (except for the very early 60's) are late pitch, this is usually not a problem, and if a mistake is made, is very easy to solve before re-installing the transmission.

The third case is a different ball of wax. If the wrong planet is used, the rebuilder will probably never know what happened even after the customer returns REPEATEDLY with the front planet splines stripped. Unless the rebuilder knows how to tell early splines from late, it is almost IMPOSSIBLE for him to replace the front planet in an A727 and keep the transmission from coming back to bite him REPEATEDLY unless he gets lucky. The problem arises from the fact that ALL front planets of the same count and pitch appear IDENTICAL regardless of type of splines. Not only that, but they are so close that it is also IMPOSSIBLE to measure the difference. Bottom line is that Chrysler (yes, they ARE to blame) built DIFFERENT planets that LOOK and MEASURE identically and they did NOT mark them differently in any way.

After twenty years of dealing with this problem, I know of ONLY one POSITIVE way to determine early splines from late splines. The solution stems from the facts that EARLY front planets will slip on ALL output shafts (BOTH early AND late) and that LATE front planets will ONLY slip on LATE output shafts. So, to separate early spline front planets from late spline ones, all you need to do is try all planets on an EARLY output shaft. If you don't have a KNOWN early shaft, then just keep trying planets on shafts until you have two that will not slip together. At that point you will have an EARLY shaft and a LATE planet. Mark and save the shaft, then test all planets. That should solve all of your comebacks related to the stripping of front planet splines.

To sum up we have the following possibilities:

  • Early gear pitch (very early 60's only)
    • 3-pinion
    • 4-pinion
  • Late gear pitch
  • Early spline type
    • 3-pinion
    • 4-pinion
  • Late spline type
    • 3-pinion
    • 4-pinion

 High Drum Names

Mopar invented the high drum, designed it, produced it, and named it. TECHNICALLY the ONLY correct name for this drum is "Front Clutch Retainer," which is what Mopar named it.

 Some of the CORRECT names for this drum are: High Drum, High/Reverse Drum, Front Drum (in front part of the transmission), Forward Drum (in the forward part of the transmission, not to be confused with the next drum which controls the forward MOTION of the vehicle), Kickdown Drum, Direct Drum, Reverse Drum (not to be confused with the Reverse Brake drum in the rear of the transmission), all of the above with "Clutch" inserted before "Drum," and all of the above with "Drum" replaced by "Retainer" or "Cylinder." These are just SOME of the American English names for this drum.

 Don't you just L-O-O-O-O-V-E the terminology in the transmission business???

 B200/B300/M300/M350/M375 transmissions will have a regular “CAR” style tail shaft/yoke and driveshaft arrangement. Dodge Chassis models M400-M500-M600 will have a fixed yoke and a two piece driveshaft due to the length between the driving rear and the transmission.  These models include the drive shaft-pinion block arrangement.

 There is a difference between SBM and BBM transmission housings; they will NOT interchange.  The internals of the assemblies will interchange.  Converters are usually inter- changeable from 727 to 727, but be careful if there are weights attached.

 The trick to installing the flex plate /converter bolts is to paint a mark at one bolt/hole combination before removing the unit. These holes are indexed and will only align at one specific hole setup. When re-installing just make sure that the two paint marks line up.  If you are installing a new converter,  just align the flex plate /converter holes and mark one side before the unit gets into the vehicle.  When everything is bolted back together just rotate the converter to align the paint marks and bolt it up.  You may have to snug a bolt or two before fully torqueing each one.  A little dab of Lock-tite on each bolt helps here.   Use only hardened bolts.

 When reinstalling a converter, there are three distinct clunks to align splines between the converter and the input shaft.  Simply align one and push in, spin and push in for a total of three clunks.  There is a distinct technique to push/pulling/aligning the splines, slowing rotating the converter while pushing/pulling.  Spin around after each attempt, and keep at it until the converter is at least ¼” inside the machined housing, here it should be bottomed out.  When the transmission is bolted together in place with the engine, but before the convertor bolts are tightened, make sure the converter spins freely and isn’t bound up.  You may have to pull it out slightly when tightening up the flexplate.

 Also a “TOWING/RV” type converter should add gas mileage and significantly help the overall driving ability of your rig.  These converters stall lower allowing for less slippage, you can pull out at idle 600-800 RPMS if you need to creep along without stalling.  On the highway there would be less slippage and therefore less net energy loss turning the transmission.

 All 360’s and some 440’s were externally balanced assemblies, they all used a specially weighted torque converter and a different harmonic balancer.    B+M (Available through JEG’s/Summit) sell a weighted flexplate to use when replacing the converter with a non-weighted unit.   Failure to add required balancing assemblies would cause eventual loss of oil pressure and then worn main bearings due to the gross engine misbalance.  This could also cause transmission problems.

 Solid flexplates are worth their weight in GOLD.  I have seen at least two broken flexplates on SBM racing engines so far, but zero on solid flexplates.

 Rear mount 3632984 Mopar, Imperial services

 Polyurethane Mount-    Mancini Racing POBOX 239 Roseville, MI 48066, 1-800-843-2821, INFO 586-294-6670, www.manciniracing.com

 Transmission mounts—ESPO, 1-800-903-9019, http://www.espo.com

 Rebuildkits-www.manciniracing.com

 Think about removing the convertor dust shield and drilling some cooling holes into it.  While driving down the highway there will be forced air into the holes allowing for more efficient cooling.  Another trick to increase cooling capacity of your transmission is to use synthetic fluid at the next oil change.  Synthetic holds up much longer under heat duress.   There are some racing transmission fluids now designed to have your automatic running cooler than regular fluids.

 Latest tip for us penny pinchers is to find or search a junk yard for a newer A518 truck pan, it’s three inches deeper, bolts up, and uses the modern reusable gasket. Make sure to grab the filter extension also, it’s necessary and allows for correct oil pickup with the deep pan.

 The new style gasket is nice, be careful not to strip the holes out.  (Seen it done at the dealer).   If you look at the gasket, it is thicker than a cork gasket.   I have been using the new gasket and have had good luck with them. YOU CAN RE-USE THE NEW STYLE MANY TIMES. BRAND X HAS BEEN USING THIS STYLE GASKET FOR MANY YEARS NOW.

The new gasket is # 2464324AC and is nylon over steel with a molded in double silicone sealing bead, very nice.    List $9.60

 Try also web site www.allpar.com/mopar/torqueflite.html for additional information



The 727 Band adjustments can be made without removing the transmission from the vehicle. There are many reasons to perform this adjustment if possible, at the same time as when your are doing a regular transmission oil and filter change. Here are some easy adjustments to perform before buttoning it back up and driving down the road.

The old timers had a way of pulling this adjustment, most likely involving putting the thing in the gear and in the air on jack stands with the weight on the axles. So as you were servicing the transmission, start adjusting the bands, torque or loosen only until you can spin the drive shaft just slightly by hand. This is where you want the final adjustments. SEE OLD TIMERS ADJUSTMENTS ATTACHED. I’m slightly more modern and prefer the written methods.

Pulled directly from a readily available Chilton’s Dodge service manual on Vans, Trucks, and RV’s page 410.

Low and Reverse Band

The pan must be removed from the transmission to gain access to the low and reverse band adjusting screw.

  1. Remove the fluid by removing the pan.  Clean pan and check the filter for debris.
  2. Loosen the band adjustment screw lock nut about 5 turns.  Be sure that the adjustment screw spins freely in the lever.
  3. 3.   Torque the adjustment screw to
  4. 4.   72 inlbs.
  5. Back off as follows:
  6. A-727: 2 turns
Keep the adjustment screw from turning, tightening and torque the lock nut to 30 ftlbs. Use a new gasket and install the pan.

 The Kickdown Band Adjustment screw is located on the left-hand side of the transmission case near the throttle lever shaft.

  1. Loosen the lock nut and back off about 5 turns.  Be sure that the adjusting screw turns freely in the case.
  2. Torque the adjusting screw to 72 inlbs.
  3. Back off the adjusting screw as follows:
  4. 1967-1972: 2 turns
  5. 1973-88 V8: 2 ½ turns
  6. 1973-84 6-cyl: 2 turns
  7. 1985-88 6 cyl: 2 ½ turns
  8. ALL Diesel – 2 turns
  9. Tighten 1967-1972: 29 ftlbs.
  1. Tighten 1973-1975: 35 ftlbs.
  2. Tighten 1976-1988: 30 ftlbs.

 This adjustment location is very, very hard to get to underneath a car, but I believe that the trucks are a little more forgiving here?   I suggest using ¼ torque wrench and sockets. The best time to do this is simply when servicing the transmission on your normal routine.  Some hand tools and an inch pounds torque wrench is all that is needed.

  Although this kit is several years old now, I feel it is worth mentioning. Again considering the options involving adding performance parts to your Mopar, try using a kickdown adjuster cabling kit from Bouchillon performance.  This kit is made specifically for people who have added a performance aluminum intake and or Holley carburetor to their Mopars.   This kit takes a lot of the pain and suffering out of the modifications

 

Basically with the throttle lever closed the lever on the trans should be all the way forward, and at WOT (wide open throttle) the trans kickdown lever should be all the way back.
         For a proper transmission kickdown linkage , several items should be easily identified.  First it should shift smoothly up through the gears, winding out but not over winding, 1500-3500 at WOT for big blocks depending on the throttle position,  3500-4500 at WOT for all the small blocks.  On the pedal at highway speeds, when attempting passing or cracking open the throttle, the transmission should shift down into passing gear (2) and rev out into third depending on the load.  Additionally, it should pull out in first gear after coming to a complete stop.  Down shifts shouldn’t be hard or noticeable.

When our motorhome was purchased in 1999, the kickdown was miss-adjusted from the start causing the transmission to up shift really fast and putter around in third gear literally burning itself up.   I remedied the problems of short shifts by popping the engine bonnet and simply adjusting the kickdown rod to throttle bracket for increased RPM shift points.  A couple of road tests confirmed each adjustment and we were in business.  One thing good accomplished, but after this was completed I was soon back to fixing it with now apparent shifting slippage problems.  A quick oil and filter change with 2 quarts of Lucas transmission oil to assist, and I got another two full seasons out of those minor changes.  The slippage problem never stopped, it just was not noticeable to the average passenger.

Realizing that I had all winter one year, 2002, we just had to have the Dodge truck transmission redone.  The transmission is usually a weak spot on any RV due to the heavy loads it has to move.  Better to rebuild it before it breaks

out on the road, it is cheaper and more convenient to do so on your own schedule.  Since then, the transmission has been very consistent so far, and during this project we added several performance items to assist with the shifting chores: A stout solid flex plate, a deeper oil pan, a shift improving kit, an external oil cooler, and a RV/towing type converter.

One trick we use on our rig is when putting a deep oil pan that holds an extra two quarts of fluid, but we will only fill it to the add line.  This is an increase of one-quart over stock but it moves the fluid level underneath and away from any of the rotation assemblies.  Although it reads add on the stick, with the deep pan it is actually fine and happy with an extra one quart of oil’s increased capacity.  This serves three purposes, number one it increases the capacity over stock with one additional quart, and number two it moves the fluid out of the rotating assembly for better frictional management.  Number three is the heat cooling capacity of the remote deep pan to chill the fluid is slightly quicker because there is less fluid to cool. 

Remember the Mopar 727 Torqueflite has a very solid reputation for durability, and there is a wealth of performance parts available for this unit. The trick in RVing is to find the happy median where we’ve increased the capabilities of the transmission but not made it too racy. To utilize better parts where the factory has some known problems, and to tailor this combination to the practical usage of the machine. Sometimes a little assistance in the right place is all we all need.

involving getting your transmission up and running the way you like it to after a performance modification.   It is composed of a cable and a spring combination that replaces the lever and rod setup that is stock Mopar.  This kit is very adjustable, the ability to adjust shift points using this kit was phenomenal. Call Bouchillon Performance, 937 Commerce Circle, Hanahan, SC 29406, 803-744-6559 if you are interested. Much better instructions than the other kits on the market, these people were helpful and knowledgeable. 

 

Basically with the throttle lever closed the lever on the trans should be all the way forward, and at WOT (wide open throttle) the trans kickdown lever should be all the way back.
         For a proper transmission kickdown linkage , several items should be easily identified.  First it should shift smoothly up through the gears, winding out but not over winding, 1500-3500 at WOT for big blocks depending on the throttle position,  3500-4500 at WOT for all the small blocks.  On the pedal at highway speeds, when attempting passing or cracking open the throttle, the transmission should shift down into passing gear (2) and rev out into third depending on the load.  Additionally, it should pull out in first gear after coming to a complete stop.  Down shifts shouldn’t be hard or noticeable.

When our motorhome was purchased in 1999, the kickdown was miss-adjusted from the start causing the transmission to up shift really fast and putter around in third gear literally burning itself up.   I remedied the problems of short shifts by popping the engine bonnet and simply adjusting the kickdown rod to throttle bracket for increased RPM shift points.  A couple of road tests confirmed each adjustment and we were in business.  One thing good accomplished, but after this was completed I was soon back to fixing it with now apparent shifting slippage problems.  A quick oil and filter change with 2 quarts of Lucas transmission oil to assist, and I got another two full seasons out of those minor changes.  The slippage problem never stopped, it just was not noticeable to the average passenger.

Realizing that I had all winter one year, 2002, we just had to have the Dodge truck transmission redone.  The transmission is usually a weak spot on any RV due to the heavy loads it has to move.  Better to rebuild it before it breaks 

 

FOLLOWING BELOW IS THE OLD TIMERS ADJUSTMENTS

 This is one of the most misunderstood procedures there is when it comes to Chrysler transmissions. Most people will shy away from this method simply because it does not involve torquing the band adjustment screw to "X" in. lbs. and then back it off "Y" turns. However, in my opinion and from my experience, using this method will give you results far superior to the factory specified method.    

 What people seem to forget about the factory method is that the technicians at the dealership weren't concerned with performance shifts. They were more concerned about having a transmission shift smoothly to suit the customers.

To do this, all you'll need are wrenches for the lock nuts and a socket for the adjuster screws. You can also use this if you just want to adjust one band.

 1.)   First, assuming you'll be doing both bands, loosen both lock nuts and snug the adjusters. You should now notice that you can no longer turn the drive shaft in either direction.

2.)   Loosen either of the adjusters until you can barely turn the drive shaft by hand. Once this happens, loosen the adjuster another ½ turn and tighten the lock nut.

Now, do the same with the other adjuster, only this time you should be trying to turn the drive

1.)   shaft in the opposite direction. Once you can barely turn it by hand, loosen the adjuster another ½ turn and tighten the lock nut.

 Not only is this procedure just as easy as the factory one, it's also more accurate. I've always been of the opinion that the factory specs made the bands too loose - especially the front one since that's the only shifting band that makes a difference in shift timing. If you're still skeptical about how well this procedure works, try the factory procedure and notice how the shifts are. Then try this one and I would be willing to bet that your shifts will be firmer. This method not only works on Chryslers, but on any transmission that has a band adjustment.

 

Happy shifting!